The artist creates a public work with the aim of sparking conversations and resolving conflicts

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At the corner of Peachtree Street and 10th Street is one of the temporary pieces created by artist Kevin Box called “Conversation Peace”. The sculpture is Box’s version of the “Rock, Paper, Scissors” game he, like others, grew up playing.

“Conversation Peace” was created by artist Kevin Box and is currently on display at the corner of Peachtree Street and 10th Street in Midtown. This sculpture is one of many temporary art installations made possible by the Midtown Alliance.

Credit: contributed

Credit: contributed

“Conversation Peace” was created by artist Kevin Box and is currently on display at the corner of Peachtree Street and 10th Street in Midtown. This sculpture is one of many temporary art installations made possible by the Midtown Alliance.

Credit: contributed

Credit: contributed

“Some people don’t get it and some get it right away, but that’s the point of a good conversation starter. I really want it to come slowly over you. I think the best work I’ve created is like an onion skin where you pull layers apart to find new meaning in it.

“I hope that’s what keeps people engaged. That it’s not just something you pass and continue. I want people to do a double take,” the artist said.

While the game is a way for kids to solve problems like who gets the last piece of pizza, Box took that theme to the next level.

“As I got older, I realized I wanted to talk about conflict resolution in a more mature way,” he said. “I had started working a lot more with Origami. The Origami crane is known as a symbol of peace in many cultures, and the dove is a symbol of peace, so I thought it would be fun to rearrange the different elements of the game in a format that really emphasizes that peace can win.

Box believes it to be one of his greatest works and one of his favorites as it “inspires conversation” and the conflict can be seen balanced by the scissors balancing on the rock with the smallest element of the sculpture, the Crane of Peace, up above out of reach of the shears.

“In a world that needs peace, that’s obvious to most of us and yet it’s not something we talk about a lot, that’s why I do the work I do,” said Box. “I think this is a really critical time in history for us to really think about these things and have these conversations, to learn to compromise, to get along and to balance our conflict.”

Conversation Peace will be on display until April 2023.

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